Category: Scones & Loaves

Scones (Easy Never Fail)

 

scones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A dear old friend of mine gave me this recipe and I haven’t had a failure with it yet.  It’s great because you can always have a carton of long life cream and a can of Lemonade in the pantry.  An easy one to whip up for unexpected visitors.

 

Banana & Chocolate Loaf

Source & History

A lovely moist loaf cake with banana and chocolate. It takes 4 large overripe bananas. It can be made ahead of time and frozen.

lovely and overripe like this

Buderim date and ginger loaf

Buttermilk Scones

Source & History

This is here mainly because it was Great-Grandmother Honeywell’s recipe. Try it and see what you think.

 

Notes

  • Grandma says that if she made this today she would add 1 tsp. baking powder for ‘extra rising’.
  • there seems to be some question about the thickness the dough should be – all Rhoda’s books say 2cm. My recipe says 2.5 cm & Pam’s says 2.5-3.5cm. Make your own decision.
  • scones are cooked when the scones in the middle of the tray are tapped on the top and sound hollow.

 

Gram’s 2-hr Buns

Source & History

Doug has this in his collection.  I think that this might be the recipe that Mum used when she made her famous (in the family, anyway) cinnamon buns.

I remember my Grannie teaching me the ‘right’ way to shape buns. She always buttered her hands when she was doing it.

Note

  • made these last weekend and they were gobbled down. However, they do go stale overnight (still good toasted) so I would be inclined from now on to make these to be eaten on the day they are made. 

Gram’s Wholemeal Bread

Source & History

This is my mother’s recipe for wholemeal bread. My brother Doug, from whom this recipe comes calls it Wholewheat Bread. I watched him make it when I was in Canada in June 2011. It was the first time in a very long time that I had freshly baked bread!

 

Notes

I made this last weekend for the first time (and have made it again since then) and there were a few things that you might like to note:

      • molasses in Australia isn’t the same as molasses in Canada – the first time I made this I substituted golden syrup for the molasses and it worked but the bread was a little sweet. The second time I used treacle – it worked really well. The bread tastes just like I remember it.
      • It doesn’t tell you how long to knead the bread – the recommended time is 10min. The first time I estimated the time.  But the bread rose much better on the second attempt when I timed the kneading and really did do 10min.
      • If you’re not sure how to knead the bread, have a look at this:

 

 

  • Before placing the dough into loaf pans you need to shape it into loaves – have a look at this to see how to do that

 

  •  And finally, Mum said that to test whether the bread is properly cooked, you should tap it on the bottom when you turn it out of the pan. If it sounds hollow the bread is done.

Gram’s Rye Bread

Source & History

This is my mother’s rye bread recipe. Mum could sometimes be rather reluctant to share recipes with those outside the family. Especially if the recipe was for something that she liked to take to community events where bringing food was expected. How could you be sure that no one else would have brought what you were bringing if you handed the recipe out to everyone? My sister-in-law says that she had to marry my brother to get this recipe! This recipe came originally from the manager of the mine where Dad worked – his origins were Swedish, so originally this was the recipe for Swedish Rye Bread. I’ve never made this, but Jane (my sister-in-law) and my brother Doug (not her husband) make it regularly which is why this recipe comes from Doug’s collection.

Note

  • The molasses in this recipe is the one you get in North America and is, I believe, made from corn. The molasses you get in Australia is not the same. If you can’t get the North American kind, try using treacle, I’ve found it works in other recipes.

Date Nut Loaf

Source & History

This is another of Mum’s recipes – I love it, which is why I rarely make it. I eat it.

Notes

  • We always use walnuts for the nuts in the recipe. Keep a few to sprinkle on the top before baking this if you want it to look a little fancy.

Banana Loaf

Source & History

This is a recipe that I copied from my mother’s recipe collection. It’s especially yummy sliced and spread with butter. It’s also a good one to take when asked to bring something for a cake stall at school.

Note

  • sprinkle the top before baking with chopped walnuts or flaked almonds or cinnamon & sugar if you want to fancy it up.   

Plain Scones

Source & History

This is another recipe from the Day to Day Cookery book. The cinnamon rolls are a quick & relatively easy way to get something similar to cinnamon buns which were a favourite when I was a kid. I could never get buns to taste the same as they do at home, and they take so long! We sometimes have them for breakfast on Christmas Day.