Chilli Con Carne

Source & History

This was originally based on my mother’s recipe for chilli but has evolved over time and she probably wouldn’t recognise it any more.

Note

  • I used to make this with beef mince but with the easy availability of chicken mince these days, I find I prefer to make it with that. You could use pork and/or veal mince if you preferred that. I have also used turkey mince.
  • The longer you simmer this the better it will be. It is also better reheated after a day or two in the fridge.
  • You can get the Mexican Chilli Beans from the supermarket
  • If you are making this in North America you might want to use more chilli powder – the Australian version of Mexican chilli powder seems to be hotter than the one available there.

Glazed Ham

Source & History

This is a recipe from the old hard-cover Women’s Weekly Cookbook (my copy has fallen apart & disappeared). This is what it looked like.

WW Cookbook

 

I have used this recipe to glaze my Christmas ham for many years  (Leah & Ben have been using it too).

Note

  • For the last few years I have been de-boning my ham before I glaze it. It makes it easy to slice once it’s cooked. 
  • I like to use the 1/2 of the ham from the hip end of the leg rather than the half with the long leg bone.

 

 

Beef with Peppers [or Aileen’s Stir Fry]

Source & History

This recipe is another one from the Women’s Weekly Chinese Cookbook. As described below in notes, I use this as the basis for any stir-fry I do.

Note

  • This is the basis for all my stir-fry recipes…cut up any vegetables you have…and whatever meat you want to use…fry the meat with the garlic & five spice powder, add the vegetables and stir fry until tender. Add combined sauce ingredients [usually doubled] and stir until boils & thickens
  • This can be served with rice or you can add dried noodles with a little extra liquid or ready-made noodles that you can get from the supermarket to the stir-fry and make it a one-pot dish.

 

Beef Curry 2

Source & History

This is the curried beef recipe from the Women’s Weekly Chinese Cookbook. It is my favourite curry.

Notes

  • The recipe uses steak and I usually use rump or fillet steak but I have also made this with chicken fillets.
  • I don’t peel the potatoes.
  • If you want to expand the quantity of curry without using more meat, increase the number of potatoes.
  • I usually double the sauce ingredients, especially if I have added more potato.

Pizza Dough

Source & History

This came from an old recipe book, in the days when I was more ambitious & organised (and on a more restricted budget). Today I usually use bought pizza bases for my ‘home-made’ pizza. This recipe makes a nice dough and is worth the time it takes.

Note

  • It’s my belief that a pizza should be constructed in the following way: spread on the sauce [tomato paste, herbs & water mixed to the consistency you prefer], then add toppings, then top with grated mozzarella cheese. You can finish off with a sprinkling of parmesan cheese if you want to.

Gram’s Rye Bread

Source & History

This is my mother’s rye bread recipe. Mum could sometimes be rather reluctant to share recipes with those outside the family. Especially if the recipe was for something that she liked to take to community events where bringing food was expected. How could you be sure that no one else would have brought what you were bringing if you handed the recipe out to everyone? My sister-in-law says that she had to marry my brother to get this recipe! This recipe came originally from the manager of the mine where Dad worked – his origins were Swedish, so originally this was the recipe for Swedish Rye Bread. I’ve never made this, but Jane (my sister-in-law) and my brother Doug (not her husband) make it regularly which is why this recipe comes from Doug’s collection.

Note

  • The molasses in this recipe is the one you get in North America and is, I believe, made from corn. The molasses you get in Australia is not the same. If you can’t get the North American kind, try using treacle, I’ve found it works in other recipes.

Sausage Rolls

Source & History

This is from the Women’s Weekly’s Cooking Class Cookbook. I usually make these once a year – at Christmas. We have sausage rolls, pies & mini quiches for dinner on Christmas Eve.

Note

  • I usually double this and use the packaged sausage mince from the supermarket.
  • The last few years I have been using the lower fat version of the puff pastry (no one has complained).

Lasagna

Source & History

This is a combination of instructions from the lasagna noodle packet, and experience.

 Note

  • You might find these 2 links useful when making this recipe

Spaghetti Bolognaise

Basic White Sauce

Spaghetti Bolognaise

Source & History

This is the family bolognaise recipe in its original form. There have been additions since (see notes) at this house, anyhow. I realised the need for sweetness to balance the other flavours after a trip to Cairns with the gymnastics club. I somehow managed to include a frozen half bucket of strawberry jam with the  frozen pre-made sauce for the spaghetti for the kids. I didn’t realise that one of the containers had jam and not spaghetti sauce in it. The kids all came back for seconds, saying it was the best spaghetti sauce ever.

Note

  • Use this basic mince mixture for lasagna as well.
  • the later versions of this contain chilli flakes (sprinkled over the top of the mixture in the pot); cracked pepper (same method of measurement).
  • I usually use passata rather than pre-made spaghetti sauce.
  • If Andrew makes this he uses 1 tin of tomatoes, 2 small containers of tomato paste & tinned whole champignons
  • if I make this I use 2 tins of tomatoes, 1 container of tomato paste and sliced fresh button mushrooms
  • sometimes I make meatballs and use them instead of the usual mince. I cook them for 10min or so in the microwave before adding them to the sauce.

Beef Satays

Source & History

Found this in some recipe book that I have since lost. They are really nice…no matter what meat you use.

Note

  • The recipe was for beef but I have used chicken breast fillets, thigh fillets, and prawns and they all turn out great.
  • It’s up to you whether you marinade the meat, then thread on the skewers or thread on skewers and then marinade. I have done it both ways. It’s easier to thread first, then you aren’t searching in the marinade for pieces of meat to thread on a skewer. It also wets the bamboo before you BBQ and prevents burning.
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